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The MILITARY COSTUME OF TURKEY.

PUBLISHED BY THOMAS McLEAN JANUARY 1, 1813
From drawings by Octavien Dalvimart (d'Alvimart), engraved by F.H. Clark


PLATE XII.

BEY.


Bey from the NYPL


Egypt is governed under a Pacha, who is nominated by the Porte, and who usually resides at Grand Cairo; by twenty-four Beys; who form a divan, of which the Pacha, who has also the title of Shek Elbelet, or prince of the country, is president.
Each Bey, however, may be considered as almost an independent sovereign in his province. The most powerful Beys form parties amongst the rest, with which they frequently make war amongst themselves; the victorious faction generally keep the Pacha almost as a prisoner, and scarcely ever pay more than a nominal submission to the Porte; the only means resorted to, by which to support its authority, is by fomenting the enmities and civil wars of the Beys, which rend and distract this ill-governed and unhappy country.
The Beys, themselves, are originally Mamelukes, which form the military force, wherewith they desolate rather than govern the country. The Mamelukes are composed of Circassian slaves, who are brought young into the country, and being trained to arms, in the use of which they are very dexterous, rise afterwards to be its despots: perhaps the world does not exhibit such another instance of national degradation, as this once famous country now does, governed, as it is, by a succession of slaves.
The accompanying subject is a representation of an Egyptian Bey, in the dress ordinarily worn while resident at the palace at Grand Cairo.
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