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The MILITARY COSTUME OF TURKEY.

PUBLISHED BY THOMAS McLEAN JANUARY 1, 1813
From drawings by Octavien Dalvimart (d'Alvimart), engraved by F.H. Clark


PLATE XVIII.

CAVALRY.


Cavalry from the NYPL


The Turkish light cavalry are remarkable for their activity, particularly those which have been raised in Georgia. Many of the corps have the privilege of selecting their own weapons; they carry pikes of different lengths, usually about six feet, having an iron point or spear, sometimes ornamented with a tassel, composed of feathers or hair. Some of these corps carry a battle-axe, but the sabre and pistols are more generally used, as is the Mameluke saddle.
The body of light cavalry, denominated Delhis, or Desperadoes, is very formidable in the charge; the attack is made in troops, and the rush on the enemy is accompanied with a shout of "Allah! Allah!" from every man, as an invocation to the Deity. They boast of their temerity; and their conduct evinces a contempt for danger and fearlessness of death: with such dauntless spirits, if properly directed, what might not be achieved? They are attentive to duty, and ever watchful; their horses are constantly girthed, whether in a stable or at the piquet, and their arms in good order, and constantly about their persons.

Next: Spahis
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