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The MILITARY COSTUME OF TURKEY.

PUBLISHED BY THOMAS McLEAN JANUARY 1, 1813
From drawings by Octavien Dalvimart (d'Alvimart), engraved by F.H. Clark


SOLDIER OF ALBANIA.


Soldier of Albania from the NYPL

PLATE XXVI.

(the description of plate XXVI belongs to picture 20)

The Albanian soldier entertains a very nice sense of honour; a blow, even amongst themselves, being revenged by immediate death. For military transgression, he is never beaten; the only punishments, in use, being either hanging or beheading.
The Albanians have long been ranked as the best troops in the Turkish armies, in which, indeed, they are on all occasions considered as the serdenguetchy, or forlorn hope.
Scanderbeg, who is the hero of so many romances, was a native and prince of a district of Albania; assisted by his brave countrymen, he threw off the Turkish yoke, and resisted the whole weight of the Ottoman power, then at its zenith, for the space of twenty three-years; after his death, his sepulchre was violated by the conquerors of his country; and a certain proof of his valour may be inferred, from the circumstance of the Janizaries having worn his bones enchased in bracelets.
The Albanians have frequently proved powerful opponents to the Russian troops, and such is the love of glory inherent in them, that when they contemplate a long interval of tranquillity in their own country, they enrol themselves in the service of the Pachas of any of the other parts of the Turkish dominions, for the purpose of gratifying their military ardour.


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