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The MILITARY COSTUME OF TURKEY.

PUBLISHED BY THOMAS McLEAN JANUARY 1, 1813
From drawings by Octavien Dalvimart (d'Alvimart), engraved by F.H. Clark


PLATE XXI.

ENSIGN BEARER OF SPAHIS.


Ensign Bearer of the Spahis from the NYPL


THE Spahis do not, as the Janizaries, ascribe more honour to their kettle than their standard.
The Turkish standards are large, particularly that which is denominated the Pacha’s. There are also numerous sacred banners borne by the attendants on the dervises attached to the army, which are green, as well as a great number of small flags or banderols belonging to the different corps. Each troop consisting of twenty-five or thirty men having one, it does not appear that these flags are borne under any other idea than that of exciting terror in the hearts of an enemy. A very different effect is more likely to be produced, since the great number of men thus uselessly employed considerably lessens the effective force, and has a tendency to impede the velocity and simplicity which military operations generally require. In case of defeat, the confusion created by such a multiplicity of these banderole bearers is excessive, and the consequences incalculable. The superstition which induces the wearing of talismans as a protection against dangers of every kind, becomes unavailing: and the banner bearer, overwhelmed by terrors on every side, becomes worse than useless as an appendage to an army.

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